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20130121
20130129
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it is a very powerful program. i get asked a lot -- what about the militarization of u.s. foreign policy? is africacom a guys to allow the into africa? is it really did get a presence on the continent? the state department of usa la st fiscal year spent between eight or $9 billion in africa. the department of defense spent a little more than $500 million. that is the dollar comparison in terms of what the level of the effort is. overwhelmingly, the u.s. government support in african countries. today category of healthcare, education, and agriculture. security is a very minor part, but an important part, but a very minor part. i think that is probably as it should be. the defense strategic guidance that i referred to in my opening comment tells me that in africa, we are to seek a light footprint and innovative approaches and low costs approaches to achieving the united states security objective. we have one base in africa. we have about 2000 people. it supports not only u.s. africa command, but u.s. central command and the transportation command as well. that is our residence on the conti
relations committee, i think a great deal of what good foreign policy about is building personal relationships and building personal relationships with leaders around the world. and the one thing that i've really observed, senator kerry, of you is that you have done that. and we have had so many of these private meetings across over there in the capitol and in the small foreign relations room and i could just feel with meeting with all these leaders, the tremendous respect that they have for you and the ability you are going to have to build on that to make an excellent secretary of state. so i'm very excited about this opportunity for you and i want, in my first question here i wanted to focus on mexico and central america. during the last decade, relations between the united states and mexico have strengthened as a result of our shared security goals relating to the initiative. and one of the pillars of that initiative includes judicial reform and you know this very well. however, the federal government and many of the mexican states have yet to pass legislation which would cha
about the september benghazi attacks and some of the foreign policy challenges facing the u.s., including iran, afghanistan, and syria. he also talked about the vietnam war after returning from vietnam over 40 years ago, he testified about his experience before this committee. john kerry is introduced by elizabeth warren, john mccain, and hillary clinton. a vote on his nomination by the full senate is expected next week. >> good morning. this hearing of the senate foreign relations committee will come to order. let me ask, as i did yesterday, i ask unanimous consent of returning members to allow prospective member to complete -- participate in today's hearing. if there is no objection, it is so ordered. let me start by saying, you are not at the table yet, senator. we will have you there shortly. wow. let me say, mr. chairman, you are still our committees chaired, deeply humbled to preside over the committee today as we consider your nomination. we are honored to welcome you as the president's nominee for a position you have most deservedly earned. the first time you testifi
opens more than 200,000 jobs to women. >> ifill: then, we turn to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against livle wages d woing conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting.
not talk about the foreign policy, they did not even have a positive economic plan. they said it will be a referendum on an unsatisfactory referendum -- unsatisfactory performance of the incumbent. the stock market was stronger. it was just good enough to drag president obama across the finish line. i think there's plenty to look at. there are plenty of problems. project orca, the get-out-the- vote project. the message is much too limited, too smug, too assumed that people would reject liberal policies because we said they were liberal. the failure to provide a positive reforming conservative agenda. where was the romney health care plan, the positive plan, not just or peeling -- repealing obamacare? i do think scott walker, sam brownback, bob jindal, that is where you alcee conservative principles govern. in washington, a half to boast -- both oppose the obama administration, collaborate, and in the house, they have to figure out what it means to the beat -- to be the majority of one body of congress while the presidency and other house and congress is held by the other party
of the president's meek foreign policy. it was score one for hillary and i think this was an attempt to kind of build on that and move beyond it and talk about hillary clinton's legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. during the hearing what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary on benghazi. the democrats weren't. both sides kept saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. some of the accomplishment. helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya to topple khadafi. assembled the coalition with the toughest sanctions ever on iran and established diplomatic ties with burma. >> i think the examples would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to a case for greatness. the groundwork on burma had been ton by the previous administration and the administration properly followed through on it. are arabs and israelis closer to peace? how about iran and north korea and the nuclear programs? halted or seriously set back? has the reset with russia which she so famously introduced with the photo
foreign policy challenges. >> usama bin laden in documents that came out of abadabad quoted as urging his cohorts to go to other places. to get away from the airplanes. get away from the drones. he specifically encouraged al-qaeda to disburse. and they did. >> senator john kerry is expected to be confirmed next week as america's top diplomat, replacing the former senate colleague who introduced him. he will face multiple crisis across the middle east. >> every day that goes by in syria, it gets worse. every day that goes by it gets worse. >> so there is, it seems to me a very strong impetus that we realize that the present policy is not succeeding. and to look at other options to prevent what is going on for now 22 months. and 60,000 dead. >> republican senator marco rubio said the obama policy on syria has been so disorganized when the situation is resolved, the people there will hate the u.s. >> as iran's best friend. grand central station for terrorists all over the world it was in our national interest to help an opposition form organize itself. >> iran's nuclear program, kerry reiter
at the kerry nomination and foreign policy challenges he'll face, with two men who've served as national security adviser to the president. zbigniew brzezinski held that position with president carter. he's now a counselor at the center for strategic and international studies. stephen hadley served under president george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he s
't manage to put benghazi into the broader context of the president's weak foreign policy which i'll be important to them when they deal, for instance with the hagel nomination. so it was score one for hillary and i think it was an attempt to build on that and move beyond it and talk about her legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. because, during the hearing, what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary, on benghazi and the democrats weren't. but, both sides kept on saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. and here's some of the points that have been brought up, some of her accomplishments. she helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya, to topple muammar qaddafi. she helped assembly the coalition that imposed the toughest sanctions ever on iran. and, she established diplomatic ties with burma. question, brit: how do you rate hillary clinton's performance, record as our top diplomat. >> i think those examples you cited would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to
choice to carry forward the obama administration's foreign policy, and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> and at her side one of her toughest critics on benghazi. today recounting how he and fellow vietnam veteran john kerry worked together to normalize relations with vietnam in the 1990s. >> helping to establish a relationship with vietnam that serves american interests and values rather than one that remained meyered many mutual resentment and bitterness is one of my proudest accomplishments as a senator. i expect it is one of john's as well. witnessing almost daily his exetch lear statesmanship is one of the highest privileges i've had here. >> kerry's first appearance on the senate foreign relations panel as an activist. some things don't change. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >> i'm tired of -- >> when i first came to washington and testified, i was testifying as part of the group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about, so i respect, i think, the woman who was voicing her concerns about t
the obama administration's foreign policy. and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> if you confirm me, i would take office as secretary, proud that the senate is in my blood. but equally proud that so too is the foreign service. >> reporter: john mccain and kerry forged close bonds over vietnam. both naval officers, mccain was imprisoned. kerry returned to testify against the war in 1971. his first appearance before this committee. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >> reporter: decades later, they united as senators to resolve p.o.w. issues and normalize relations with vietnam. >> working toward that end with john and witnessing almost daily his exemplary statesmanship is one of the highest privileges i've had here. >> reporter: today, they do have differences. mccain is more willing to arm the rebels in syria. >> i think we ought to tell the syrian people that we're either going to help them or we're not. >> if you have a complete implosion of the state, nobody has clearer definition of how you put those pieces back together. >> reporter: he and others also pressed
. winnie stachelberg will join us. and president obama posing foreign-policy -- president obama's foreign-policy with max boot. and workplace speech laws were guarding social media. is the guest.ear >> finance started in the 1930s. it is really a spinoff as a self help. the 1930s is known for everything from the hard economic times to the 1930s, easy everything from alcoholics anonymous to getting rich to various social activists movements. fascism and communism start to be a big deal. porter develops personal finance. her goal is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. it is very much of its time, an idea that we can teach people certain skills and if they learn these skills, we will all be ok. >> the dark side of the financial industry with helaine olen. like us on facebook. c-span, created by american cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your tv provider. >> secretary of state hillary clinton was questioned about the september 11 attacks about that u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi, libya. a u.s. ambassador died in that attack and three
for a secretary of state and for the united states generally in foreign policy have not waned. they have probably increased. in libya and benghazi and secretary clinton tried to make this point and senator kerry as well that the funding for all of these things is -- it's a fine it amount of money, and it's shrinking at the moment. the difficulty of a world that remains kredably complex, probably more complex, with our somewhat increasingly limited ability to sort of address every hotspot that we like, it's a very, very difficult challenge for any secretary of state. john kerry or anyone else. we saw it with hillary clinton. yes, she had successes clearly, but she also centeringled at times too. i don't know if it's a job no one wants. john kerry clearly wants it. it's not an easy job, by any measure. >> in fact, john kerry has want that job all his life. susan page, he even got emotional today talking about his father, who is a foreign service officer and how he was raised az foreign service kid traveling around the world. something that was held against him when he was running for president in 2
think they can wait you out. this is an opportunity for us to develop a foreign policy that reflects, again, the dynamics of the region as they really are today. lastly, i think this is an opportunity for the committee to finally do the work that it should have been doing for years. when you read the record and realize we have never done an authorization of the state department in the six years i have been here, we have never looked at how foreign aid has been spent. we have never done a top to bottom review. it is something people like you come to this position, look at as something that is healthy. there was mention of cost. i was disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of people i respect was money, money, money. this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spent or if that could have prevented what was happening -- what happened because we have never had an authorization. i want to close again by thanking you for your service, thanking you for your friendship, thanking you for your transparency, and i certai
on counts issues, ensuring the diplomacy is an essential part of our country's foreign policy. and your tireless efforts to elevate women and girls' rights is without comparison. you have strengthened our state department, made it better today than when you arrived. as ranking member on the africa subcommittee, i am especially appreciative of the attention you've given to the 54 congratulations -- nations of africa. while aftercation ca may lose one -- while africa may lose one of its champions at the state department, i trust africa will not be far from your thoughts and will remain a top priority in your exueture -- in your future work. i also want to associate my comments with congressman sherman who said that it's unfortunate that this is the last time we will hear from you. so i want to focus my time on moving us forward and asking your advice. you made reference in your testimony about best value contracts. and you mentioned, i believe, several nations where best value contracts are not used. and in thinking about africa and the instability and a number of nations in northern afri
and on down bear responsibility. it was contradictory when it came to actual foreign policy and the question -- what difference does it make -- it makes a difference if the attackers were local vendors hiding rocket propelled grenade launchers in hummus or international terrorists who have been popping up in algeria in that hostage situation where three americans were killed. clearly to understand what happened, how to prevent it, and bring the perpetrators to justice it makes a difference. >> hummus -- i like how you worked that in. this week marked the anniversary of the roe v. wade decision. an interesting backdrop for a new bill proposed in new mexico where a republican state lawmaker wants a law that would punish a rape victim if she becomes pregnant from the attack and has an abortion. she would be charged with tampering with evidence. let me get your take on this, amy. i'll go to you first. >> yeah. i looked at the story, it was so strange. and i did a bit more research. in fact, that female lawmaker i should underscore, she said that that was very misinterpreted. and in fact, she has
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)